She’s Upset but he’s Annoyed – more language talk

Standard

This is an interesting one, why was I seen as upset by a couple of women  when complaining about a service this week and not plain annoyed?  I’m sure if I was a man, my complaint would have been seen as me being annoyed or even angry, but you don’t hear that a man is upset when he is complaining about something?

Recently, I found this happened to me during a conversation with three women at my Daughters school where I was complaining about the difficulty getting a response from the accounts area to check the school fee bill.   I was complaining about the service and the lack of ability of someone to take a message and return a call.  Instead of my complaint being relayed correctly, or even half correctly to the person in charge, the first thing that they said to me when getting on the phone to me this morning was, ” I believe you are upset”.  You have got to be joking!  After I expressed annoyance and the request for a meeting with who ever was in charge I got that I was upset.  This female to female mode of operation just devalues us all.  Why are women afraid to call it as it is? I was plain angry, annoyed and somewhat pissed off at the efforts that I, as a paying customer had to go to in order to get a response.  I was not  merely ‘upset’?  But upset is a term that is easily equated with a woman.  When I was young, people would describe some women as ‘nervy’ or ‘highly strung’ meaning that they were most likely frustrated with the limitations of their life and expressing this frustration in a ways that were not acceptable.  Instead of addressing these issues, particularly men choose to negate the feelings of these women by labelling them with belittling terms like nervy.  Other women bought into this and the women who was ‘upset’ was pacified with a Bex powder or sedative to get them back to peaceful submissiveness.
Recently I saw the movie, “hysteria”‘ which is about the events that lead up to the invention of the vibrator around the time at the first female suffragettes were speaking out about the injustice of inequitlty for women and were demanding the right to vote.  These women were clearly annoyed, they were frustrated with the lack of opportunity open to them to have self determination in their own lives and agitated for change.  The display of annoyance, defiance and outspokenness was at odds with the norm of the day and the view that women should defer to men in all things.  Their accepted role in society at that time was to be supporter and carer, a mere object of a man’s desires, not having the ability to shape their own lives.  This must have been incredibly frustrating and many women would surely have been angry without fully understanding the reasons for their anger.  Unfortunately for many women at the time, this annoyance and anger was seen as abnormal and something that needed to be treated by the medical profession.  They were seen as having a mental illness and society at that time just couldnt accept that women could experience the same feelings of annoyance, frustration and anger as men.  The condition became medicalised and an illness called hysteria was created.  Women who’d persisted in trying to assert their rights were seen as difficult and very often committed to mental institutions suffering appalling conditions as a result.
The film deals with this period in a light hearted way and describes one doctors search for a cure to hysteria.  Surprisingly he did this by providing a ‘medical procedure’ that today we would call masterbation, abiet administered by a male doctor in a surgery.  At the time females were not considered to be sexual and it was just not even considered that they would need to be satisfied sexually.  The treatment worked to relieve the symptoms of hysteria by ‘releasing’ a build up of stress and ‘nerves’.
So lets stop treating each other like nervy, upset women.  Lets stop playing into the stereotype of frail, emotional women and as other women, lets start treating each other as individuals that should be respected and acknowledged for the people we  sometimes display justifiable annoyance!  The whole ‘upset’ tag just serves to put us back in our place of disempowerment – so lets stop doing it to each other.

Do you want to create real change and stop just talking about women’s empowerment? Join us at the Gender Economics Working Conference, June 10-11, Sydney.

Standard

susannemoore:

Early Bird Registrations open NOW! Make a difference to the future for men and women!

Originally posted on Gender Economics.com:

Image

Centre for Gender Economics

 

Productive discourse requires certain fundamental understanding that can shape and inform the conversation. Solving the problem of gender inequity requires that we understand how economic and organisational ‘barriers’ arose. These barriers were created over time — they rose up over generations — and, now, it is time to take a fresh look and ask ourselves if these barriers are holding all of us back. Greater gender parity enables economic and organizational innovation, improved corporate financial performance and stronger, more sustainable communities. 

Gender Economics combines practical and positive business experience with academic research. This approach reveals the root cause creating and sustaining barriers to women’s economic empowerment. With this knowledge, practical and implementable tools can be developed and deployed so organizations, men and women can share in the economic development of our shared society only for themselves but for their families and communities. Early Bird Register…

View original 9 more words

Woman of Change = Alison Watkins, the new CEO of Coca-Cola Amatil

Standard

Alison Watkins

Alison Watkins

Alison Watkins, the new CEO of Coca-Cola Amatil. Photo: Christopher Pearce

Woman of Change – Dr Janet Yellen – US Senate as chair of the US Federal Reserve

Standard

Dr Janet Yellon, photo Reuters

Dr Janet Yellon, photo Reuters

Dr Janet Yellen, President Barack Obama’s nominee to lead the U.S. Federal Reserve, is sworn in to testify at her U.S. Senate Banking Committee confirmation hearing in Washington. Photo: Reuters

Last week, Dr Janet Yellen, 67, was confirmed by the US Senate as chair of the US Federal Reserve, a position she will take up when the term of current chair, Ben Bernanke, expires on January 31.
Read more of this story: http://www.smh.com.au/comment/meet-the-most-powerful-woman-in-the-world-20140116-30×18.html#ixzz2qjGBkT9J

Read more about Dr Yellen here

Irena Sendler, a remarkable story of courage…

Standard

Please share this remarkable story of courage…

Irena

Irena Sendler

During WWII, Irena got permission to work in the Warsaw ghetto, as a Plumbing/Sewer specialist. She had an ulterior motive.

Irena smuggled Jewish infants out in the bottom of the tool box she carried. She also carried a burlap sack in the back of her truck, for larger kids.

Irena kept a dog in the back that she trained to bark when the Nazi soldiers let her in and out of the ghetto. The soldiers, of course, wanted nothing to do with the dog and the barking covered the kids/infants noises.

During her time of doing this, she managed to smuggle out and save 2500 kids/infants. Ultimately, she was caught, however, and the Nazi’s broke both of her legs and arms and beat her severely.

Irena kept a record of the names of all the kids she had smuggled out, In a glass jar that she buried under a tree in her back yard. After the war, she tried to locate any parents that may have survived and tried to reunite the family. Most had been gassed. Those kids she helped got placed into foster family homes or adopted.

In 2007 Irena was up for the Nobel Peace Prize.
She was not selected.
Al Gore won, for a slide show on Global Warming.

Please share this to honor the sacrifice and courage of this fine human being who gave so much and saved so many.
http://www.irenasendler.org/

— with Eolia Katherine, Bert Welkom, Nancy Duong, Jefferson Alexander Alcivar Mera, Yulius Yahya, Rajiv Mohan, Ceespial Aaron and Serge Portal.

Be patient and remember how you were looked after

Standard

photo by Guillermo Peña

photo by Guillermo Peña

My dear girl, the day you see I’m getting old, I ask you to please be patient, but most of all, try to understand what I’m going through. If when we talk, I repeat the same thing a thousand times, don’t interrupt to say: “You said the same thing a minute ago”… Just listen, please. Try to remember the times when you were little and I would read the same story night after night until you would fall asleep.

When I don’t want to take a bath, don’t be mad and don’t embarrass me. Remember when I had to run after you making excuses and trying to get you to take a shower when you were just a girl?

When you see how ignorant I am when it comes to new technology, give me the time to learn and don’t look at me that way … remember, honey, I patiently taught you how to do many things like eating appropriately, getting dressed, combing your hair and dealing with life’s issues every day… the day you see I’m getting old, I ask you to please be patient, but most of all, try to understand what I’m going through.

If I occasionally lose track of what we’re talking about, give me the time to remember, and if I can’t, don’t be nervous, impatient or arrogant. Just know in your heart that the most important thing for me is to be with you.

And when my old, tired legs don’t let me move as quickly as before, give me your hand the same way that I offered mine to you when you first walked. When those days come, don’t feel sad… just be with me, and understand me while I get to the end of my life with love. I’ll cherish and thank you for the gift of time and joy we shared. With a big smile and the huge love I’ve always had for you, I just want to say, I love you … my darling daughter.

Original text in Spanish and photo by Guillermo Peña.
Translation to English by Sergio Cadena

Posted on AARP Facebook Page

AARP is leading a revolution in the way people view and live life after 50.

100 Global Inspirational Women in Mining

Standard

susannemoore:

Recognising those inspirational Changing Women in the mining industry.

Originally posted on DPRF™ - Diversity Program Review Framework:

Jenny Knott - CEO Standard Bank Plc

Jenny Knott – CEO Standard Bank Plc

This publication, Sponsored by Standard Bank looks at “the significant and varied impact of women within the global mining industry. It is a celebration of the incredible talent that exists”, and will surely influence and inspire many others.
The mining industry knows that its future depends on attracting and retaining the right talent and mining companies understand that this means attracting women to fill roles withing their organisations to bring a gender balance that assists in promoting healthy workplaces and healthy mining communities.

Jenny Knott, Chief Executive Standard Bank Plc says in the forward,

“The fact remains, sadly that mining is still not a very gender diverse sector and it seems that the overall industry has not yet acted cohesively upon the many studies that demonstrate the correlation between gender diversity and improved company performance.” 

Proving a positive link between gender diversity…

View original 39 more words

No Ms, Mrs or Miss

Standard

Very often when I am filling out a form I am asked if my title is Mrs, Miss or Ms. I don’t like to put Ms because it carries the connotation of feminist which I don’t consider myself to be.

I am a person and don’t want to be labeled as anybodies anything. I want to be me. I just want to have Susanne Moore with no title because my name is my title. I am me.

I Respect These Female Heroes So Much More With Tiny Waists And Sparkly Dresses! LOL J/K.

Standard

Paige Worthy Reblogged from Paige Worthy from Upworthy.com
“There’s a place for princesses, and there’s a place for real, seriously ass-kicking women who are standing up to the world’s problems. Example: The thing about Malala as a princess? She didn’t get locked in a tall tower or eat a poison apple — the Taliban shot her in the head. She doesn’t need a gown or a tiara to create her place in history, and we need to be teaching that to little girls.Still not sure what the artist is doing here? Scroll all the way down for a great quote about it straight from him.”
Not sure if this is the way to address the issue but potentially the artist has good intentions, its just that I have already seen these images replicated around the internet and in some cases the message is that these fabulous female role models are not actually attractive enough naturally and need the ‘Disney Princess Treatment’.